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Our LocationAhmadu Bello University, Zaria

IDR&T/IDRC AND MAMBAYA

S/N

Names

Departments

1.

Prof. Khadija Mahmud

Education Psychology & Counselling

2.

Prof. T.E Lawal

Science Education

3.

Prof. Sadiq Mohammed

Arts & Social Science Education

4.

Prof. G.L. Likko

Educational Psychology & Counselling

5.

A.I. Umar

IDR&T

6.

Prof. Mamman Musa

Science Education

7.

Prof. Raymond .B. Bako

ACENPEE

8.

Dr. I.D. Abubakar

Arts & Social Science Education

9.

Prof. J.A Gwani

Human Kinetics & Health Education

 

UPSCALING TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL SKILLS IN NORTHERN NIGERIA THROUGH SYNERGISING THE FORMAL, INFORMAL AND OFF-GRID CENTRES

 

RESEARCH PROPOSAL SUBMITTED BY THE INSTITUTE FOR DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH AND TRAINING (IDR&T) AND THE CENTRE FOR HISTORICAL DOCUMENTATION AND RESEARCH, AREWA HOUSE, AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY, ZARIA TO RESEARCH CENTRE, MAMBAYYA HOUSE, BAYERO UNIVERSITY, KANO, NIGERIA

Technical centres and modes of skills acquisition in indigenous forms and contents have existed before colonial control of Nigeria. The colonial encounter has atrophied but not completely stamped out indigenous technical skills. When colonial technical trainings, and subsequently centres, was established, they were meant to operate under the rubric of the colonial ideology of generating low-level technical manpower to service the colonial machinery and appropriate the wealth of Nigeria for mainly the metropolitan European centres (Walter Rodney: 1990). Owing to the scant attention colonial policy paid to the organic overall technical development of the colony; national infrastructure was equally lacking, and if available, require relatively high skilled workers, majority of whom turned out to be expatriates. After independence, Nigeria, especially in the Northern Region, reacted to the dearth of technical manpower by additional set-up of trade and skills acquisition centres, technical schools; and in more recent times, Polytechnics and Universities of Technologies. While in functional and pedagogical terms, there is an increase in volume of potential technical personnel, the relationship of this to overall national development remains dispersed. What has remained missing is the purposive integration of indigenous technical know-how with modern technical practices in modern technical centres in Nigeria. The failure to synergise the formal and informal technical acquisition processes is not only wasteful but has unwittingly stalemated Nigeria’s great capacity to apply creativity and innovation for industrial development.
Thus, the raison d’être of this research from a development interventionist perspective, is to deploy the Northern states of Nigeria to demonstrate the import of modern technical schools/centres and indigenous entrepreneurial capacities, evidenced by local fabrications and service areas called Pantekas and many other corollary instances, in the Kano mercantilist tradition and the famous Okene fabrics that has become globally renown, for example. The fusion of modern and indigenous technical capacities will fundamentally reposition technical education and application beyond paper certification and government employment and insert technical knowledge and application as organic and generic to meet national and global demands with a typically grounded national character and resonance.
acquisition centres as well as vocational institutions in the region.
According to Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) World Factbook Demographic Statistics (2011: cited in Ikem (2011), about 55.9% of Nigerians between the ages 15-64 (most vibrant and active population) are jobless. Similarly, the National Bureau of Statistics (2012) reports that national unemployment rate increased to 23.4% in 2012 compared to 21.1% in 2010 and 19.7% in 2009 (World Factbook Demographic Statistics, 2011).
If these problems persist even in the presence of salutary government policies and Acts, some of them ensuing from Intercontinental instruments and institutions like the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) and their National domestication as National Economic Empowerment Strategy (NEEDS) and their attributive variants, then the causes for the limited impact of these policies have to be more assiduously reexamined.  In Nigeria, for example, while acknowledging the fact that Technical skills acquisition and vocational learning centres are all over Northern Nigeria and in a moribund state, off-grid technical and skills acquisition centres abound that are fairly well equipped but underutilized. With some of the Institutional centres and activities merged with the Ministry of Humanitarian Affairs, there is the need to study the current state of all these Institutions and training centres in order to understand their comparative strengths, availability of equipment and staffing capacities therein and how collectively they may led to better technical skill delivery and functional knowledge application. To reactivate technical skills and vocation centres in situ is to engage in reforms that mask the dysfunctional nature national technology articulation between the formal and informal processes of technical education and what nexus it occupies in overall national development. As Oke (2005) observed, technical education necessary for human capital development, must be learnt through effective training and long practical experience. The effectiveness and acquisition of technical skills also devolves on the availability and functionality of relevant and related training centres, which our research posits is beyond the current articulation and understanding of the centres and how they can birth technical knowledge as a national norm that permeate all sectors of national life. Thus, owing to the lack of synergy of the formal and informal processes of technical centres and owing to the paucity of technical skills in especially the north of Nigeria, in implementing this strategy, the Northern region can quickly build human capacity and capital of the teeming youth population. Hence, the need for Government, Private Individuals, Corporate bodies and International Development partners to support this idea that would greatly aid in bringing about the economic transformation of the region. 
The Study Area extents from Latitude 13° 28' 41.01"N to 8° 32' 9.96"N of the equator and Longitude 4° 8' 30.37"E to 11° 54' 39.77"E of the Greenwich meridian

Project Committee Members

  • Prof. Binta Abdulkarim (Director IDR&T)
  • Abubakar Sule Sani (Deputy Dir. IDR&T)
  • Prof. J. A. Gwani (Committee Chairman)                
  • Prof. Raymond Bako
  • Dr. A.I Umar                                                  
  • Prof. T. E. Lawal                                                                
  • Prof. Muazu Maiwada                                                           
  • Dr. G. L. Likko                                                                      
  • Dabo Yusuf                                                     
  • Ibrahim Modibbo Abdu                                             
  • Prof. Mamman Musa
  • Dr. I. D. Abubakar                                                     
  • Ogbe Sunday John                                    
  • Prof. K. Mahmoud     
  • Prof. Sadiq Mohammed                                            
Bashir MuAzu